Why You Should Switch to an Electric Toothbrush

How many of us take the time to diligently brush each and every tooth, twice a day? Or even pay attention to how carefully we brush? Well, there is one easy way to help with that, and that is to make the switch to an electric toothbrush. They may cost more than the 3-4 toothbrushes you’re supposed to go through in a year, but the improved dental benefits can easily outweigh the cost. It isn’t only dentists who think so, either: In a survey of 16,000 patients published by the American Dental Association, more than 80 percent said they improved their oral cleanliness after switching from their manual toothbrushes to an electric version [source: Electric Toothbrush Reviews]. Electric toothbrushes do a lot of the work for you, and do it better than we can. They have been engineered to properly clean each tooth. A normal person achieves about 300 strokes a second while brushing, but using an electric toothbrush improves that number to well above 3,000. The Sonic brushes can even go over 30,000 strokes per second, and all at a gentle pressure to maximize cleaning of your teeth without doing any harm. Some of the newer electric toothbrushes also come equipped with timers to make sure we brush the full two minutes too. A variety now even come with BlueTooth, and will connect with your phone to play music or tell you when to switch to a different part of your mouth. There are some people who even argue that using an electric brush is a “greener.” According to experts at Green Your, it takes between 14 and...

Starting Your Kids on a Path to Healthy Teeth

It can be a challenge to keep your kids on a consistent brushing schedule, but it is extremely important that you do! Teaching your kids to start a healthy routine of brushing two times a day and flossing once every day can help them form these habits for their whole life. You may think that if your child is young and still has their baby teeth, it isn’t important to take them to the dentist, but dental care for children is just as important as it is for adults. The American Dental Association recommends that you take your child within six months of getting get their first tooth or by their first birthday. Baby teeth serve as guides to the adult teeth, and if they fall out too early, or become very unhealthy, it can affect the alignment of the adult teeth that are coming in. Children have many of the same issues as adults and experience.   For more information visit: http://www.ada.org/en/public-programs/give-kids-a-smile/how-to-care-for-your-childs-teeth Taking your kids go to the dentist regularly will also increase their comfort level with their dentist overall. This will help them ensure they are educated about their teeth and dental hygiene, and lessen the anxiety of going to the dentist and begin a positive experience that will last a lifetime. It can also reinforce the idea of going every six months, an important notion for adults as well! Dental health is important at all ages, it is no different for children. Impressions can be made and lessons learned in those early years, and a healthy mouth is important to lead a healthy...

Teeth Whitening – More Than Just an Aesthetic Fix

We all want to improve ourselves on some level. No one is perfect, and no one ever will be. But we still try every day to at least feel better about ourselves. Well, there’s one easy way we can do that. It won’t cost much, it won’t be painful or use any complicated procedures, and this one simple step can have many benefits. Have your teeth whitened! Studies have shown the immense benefits of having your smile professionally whitened. Not only will you look better, but you will FEEL better about yourself. You will most definitely feel more confident in your smile, and feel yourself smiling bigger and more often. The people around you will start to smile more too, as your new pearly whites will immediately brighten any room you walk into. 99% of adults think that having a white smile is an important social asset, and can also make you appear more attractive. You won’t feel like you have to hide your smile, or do the close-lipped smiles around others, or even for photographs. If you have a special occasion coming up, and you want to look your best, having your teeth whitened is a great little touch that can help you look and feel better. Probably the most important benefit, however, is the improvement to your dental health. While the whitening process itself doesn’t make your teeth any healthier, studies have shown that people who have their teeth whitened will begin to take better care of their teeth. You’ll want to protect your new, white teeth, and that will have positive side effects on your oral...

Dental Health and Heart Health  

Do healthy gums mean a healthy heart? There’s no question that regular brushing, flossing and dental checkups can keep your mouth healthy. But if you fall short on your hygiene routine, can gum disease actually cause heart disease? There’s no conclusive evidence that preventing gum disease — periodontitis — can prevent heart disease or that treating gum disease can lessen atherosclerosis, the buildup of artery-clogging plaque that can result in a heart attack or stroke, according to an American Heart Association statement. “The mouth can be a good warning signpost,” said Ann Bolger, M.D., William Watt Kerr Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “People with periodontitis often have risk factors that not only put their mouth at risk, but their heart and blood vessels, too. But whether one causes the other has not actually been shown.” Periodontitis and heart disease share risk factors such as smoking, age and diabetes, and both contribute to inflammation in the body. Although these shared risk factors may explain why diseases of the blood vessels and mouth can occur simultaneously, some evidence suggests that there may be an independent association between the two diseases. While the research is ongoing, seeing your dentists regularly, flossing and brushing twice daily, along with other heathy lifestyle choices including diet, exercise, not smoking and keeping your weight at a healthy level will all contribute to a better health. It is important to consult your health care professional for specific recommendations as every individual is different. For more information visit: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/healthy-teeth-healthy-heart              ...

Toast to fewer cavities with red wine this holiday!

With the holidays upon us you may want to make your adult beverage of choice red wine. Red wine has long been touted for the health benefits associated with heart disease, and according to a recent study you can a reduction cavities to the list! According to an article written by Dentistry Today, when it comes to oral heath, we now have yet another reason to drink red wine. The theory is that the grape extract is slowing the bacteria responsible for cavities growth rate. Information that appeared in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry study found that red wine and a grape seed extract could prevent cavities. If this information is true, natural products may be developed that protect against dental disease with fewer side effects than wine. To read the entire article visit Dentistry Today at...

Warning-Study Finds Wearing Dentures to Bed Increases Risk of Pneumonia

According to recent research seniors in a three year study who went to sleep while wearing their dentures were twice as likely to get pneumonia as those who did not. The study followed over 400 denture wearers and found that forty one percent who wore their dentures while sleeping were twice as likely to develop pneumonia. The study advises the results were clear, no one should wear dentures to bed. The study was published in the October online edition of Journal of Dental Research. While wearing dentures to bed is never a recommended practice, with this new finding it is more important than ever to remove them prior to sleep. It is estimated that up to thirty five million Americans have no teeth, and that twenty million wear dentures. With today’s advanced dental care and the use of implants instead of dentures there is hope that future generations will have reduced numbers of Americans without teeth. For more information on the study visit:...

Fact Over Fiction, Oral Health Myths Revealed

The Good, Bad and, the Ugly About Oral Health There are many misconceptions about oral health that can prevent us from seeking treatment when needed, or scare of unnecessarily. As the saying goes, knowledge is power, so with the help of AAP below you will find the most common misinformation below, please put it to good use! According to the AAP, some of the most common misconceptions about oral health are: The primary reason for tooth brushing is to remove food debris.  FACT: Daily brushing and flossing will also keep the formation of plaque to a minimum. If not removed every 26 hours, plaque will irritate gums, which can lead to periodontal disease. Bleeding gums are normal.  FACT: Bleeding gums are one of the eight signs of gum disease. Think of gum tissue as the skin on your hand. If your hands bled every time you washed them, you would know something is wrong. Oral health doesn’t affect overall health.  FACT: When the gums are infected, periodontal bacterial byproducts can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and set off other problems. Research suggests this may contribute to the development of heart disease, the nation’s leading cause of death; increase the risk of stroke; increase a woman’s risk of having a pre-term, low birth weight baby; and pose a serious threat to people whose health is compromised by diabetes, respiratory diseases or osteoporosis. Bad breath is caused by a lack of oral hygiene.  FACT: Excellent oral hygiene doesn’t necessarily relieve bad breath. There are certain kinds of bacteria in the mouth that produce volatile sulfur compounds. If these sulfur compounds build up...

Oil Pulling — Ayurvedic medicine dating back thousands of years, the latest trend in oral health?

Any time spent recently on the internet has probably led you to some article on oil pulling.  Not only is it claimed to be better than conventional oral hygiene, but many are claiming benefits such as healthier hair, clearer skin, whiter teeth, elimination of parasites, improved body odor, and easing of joint pains.  This newly focused attention on the importance of oral health is always welcomed, however it is important as professionals to make certain these trends are actually delivering what they are promising. Should you make oil pulling a new part of your health routine?  Here are some reasons to avoid oil pulling. First, if it did work, it takes too long.  Almost all of the proponents of oil pulling suggest 20 minutes of swishing to obtain the benefit.  Twenty minutes for most people to add to their “normal” routine will seem like a lifetime.  Brushing our teeth twice a day for two minutes and flossing for another minute or even two equates to at most six minutes daily.  This is even hard for a lot of people to do.  I am saving you 14 minutes by not doing oil pulling.  You’re welcome 🙂  Proper brushing and flossing has been shown to be effective at keeping our teeth and gums healthy.  Why drift from something proven and endorsed by the American Dental Association?  I realize the traditional approach isn’t as exciting, and unlikely to be endorsed by glamorous celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, but nonetheless this approach will be successful, time after time. Second, it doesn’t do what they claim it does.  As for the oil pulling and the claims of whiter...
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